Use an APDS-9930 Ambient Light and Proximity Sensor with Python (Raspberry PI/PC)

APDS-9930 I2C sensor connected to VGA

A few weeks ago I posted an article on how to find your computer’s hidden I2C port. Today I’m going to take it one step further and show you how to actually use it.

After making the Arduino library for the APDS-9930 ambient light and proximity sensor, I decided to port it to Python. In this post I’m going to show you how to use it. Continue reading “Use an APDS-9930 Ambient Light and Proximity Sensor with Python (Raspberry PI/PC)”

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Find Your Computer’s Hidden I²C Port and Use It!

If you don’t know what I2C (read “I-squared-C”) is, you may want to check out its Wikipedia page, but in a few words, it’s an amazing protocol that allows communication between one (or more, according to Wikipedia) master devices and one or more slave device, using only 4 wires, two for power supply and two for data. Every slave device has its own unique address that the master can address to request information from the slave.

There are sooo many applications and useful electronic gadgets that use this protocol, like screens and sensors, and if you have an Arduino you might have already used it before without even knowing. Check if your sensor/display/toaster has two pins named SDA and SCL. If it does, it’s probably I2C-compatible, and you might be able to use it with your computer. Continue reading “Find Your Computer’s Hidden I²C Port and Use It!”

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